Category: my publications

“5G Network Slicing for Digital Inclusion” at IEEE COMSNETS 2018

Colleagues and I wrote a paper “5G Network Slicing for Digital Inclusion” the 10th IEEE COMSNETS – International Conference on COMmunication Systems & NETworkS, this January in Bengaluru, India. We focused on the societal challenges related to Digital Inclusion. Paper revisits the 5G mobile communication objectives, and adds the demand for 5G network slicing providing free access to information for all. We introduce the Internet light concept of free provision of information in developing economies. In order to ensure net-neutrality, our approch of Internet light provides content type filtering, with free access to text, pictures and local video, and paid access to video, voice, games and other streaming content.

From 1G to 5G mobile network development

The paper suggests that Internet light for all supports sustainable business operation, as only only 2-2.5% of the available bandwidth is used for free access to information, while more than 97% of the bandwidth are available for commercial business operation. Given the societal advances in digital literacy, digital inclusion and the participation in the digital society, Internet light is seen as the enabler to connect the unconnected 3.5 billion people on the planet and to become the catalyst for the Sustainable Developmetn Goals (SDGs).

You can read the paper here.

The reference: Josef Noll, Sudhir Dixit, Danica Radovanovic, Maghsoud Morshedi, Christine Holst, Andrea S. Winkler, “5G Network Slicing for Digital Inclusion“, IEEE COMSNETS 2018, Jan 2018, Bangalore, India

Towards an inclusive society

An article I wrote few months ago (and was that prompt not to share it here) is about the current activities and projects at the Basic Internet Foundation I wrote earlier. We’re working on providing free access to Global Health Information in Tanzania, and education information in DR of Congo. It is published on Global Voices Community blog, where you can read it, and is currently available in English, Portuguese, and Spanish.

The influence of internet communities on communication-social processes – my PhD dissertation

The influence of internet communities on communication-social processes in the networked environment.

Abstract

The structure and dynamics of online communities reveal, expand and transform the possibilities for social and business networking, by implementing the new technological solutions. Internet communities represent different web applications and social networking sites that in addition to social and media context, aim at the most important communication performance: the interaction. In this dissertation, the technological and organizational structure of the internet communities were explored, in addition to the description of communication processes, their structure and communication conventions. The aim is to present a typology of the internet communities in Serbia, by the content analysis, online surveys and semi-structured interviews as methods for the empirical research. The focus of this work is to explore the representation and use of the internet and web services, as well as the emergence of the internet communities and exploration of communication opportunities that new digital technologies provide in everyday communication and the academic community. In addition to a better understanding of global communication and participation of organizational systems and individuals from Serbia in a given process, this study aims to show the importance and inevitability of new digital communication technologies in everyday communication, in modern education and in science. By deploying theories of digital communications and sociology of web, as well as the empirical evidence – in the thesis attention will be paid to the possibilities of application of internet technologies in the area of higher education. Through the categories of new sociability and networked community, the processes of collaboration and interaction are explored, and communication possibilities in the internet communities in Serbia are tested.  New phenomena that emerge in the communication and collaboration practices in an advanced intelligent system, such is a higher education community, will be analysed and presented.

Keywords:

Internet communities, social networks, communication processes, digital inequalities, usage of internet in higher education, digital divide

 

Last week, I defended my doctorate, a five year old research in the form of dissertation on the Armistice Day (ironic coincidence or not) 11.11.2015. It included a dissertation talk, a defense at the Faculty of Continue reading “The influence of internet communities on communication-social processes – my PhD dissertation”

the news of paper acceptance in New Media & Society!

the news of paper acceptance in New Media & Society!

New_media_&_SocietyI have wonderful news to share! You may have noticed that just last week my colleague, Bernie, posted the exciting news we just received from New Media & Society editors, that our paper has been accepted. The paper, which I collaborated on with my esteemed colleagues; Bernie Hogan, from Oxford Internet Institute, and Danijela Lalic, from Faculty of Technical Sciences in Novi Sad, will be published in New Media & Society which is the  #1 communication journal, as ranked by Google Scholar. We are honored and thrilled to be selected for inclusion in this extremely reputable and wide reaching publication. In the paper, we explored and presented an empirical evidence demonstrating different types of digital divides, with a focus on tensions surrounding digital literacy and collaboration, present in the higher education community in Serbia. An electronic version of the publication will be available soon. Keep an eye out for it, and let us know what you think!

An update [July 7, 2015] You can access and read the NM&S article following this link.

 

100 Quotes by 100 Women about the Web

As more and more people awaken to the threats against our basic rights online, we must start a debate – everywhere – about the web we want.- Sir Tim Berners-Lee

Image source: https://webwewant.org/about_us
Image source: https://webwewant.org/about_us

Web We Want is a global movement to defend, claim and change the future of the Web. The focus is on using innovative approaches to build support for national and regional campaigns to create a world where everyone, everywhere is online and able to participate in a free flow of knowledge, ideas, collaboration and creativity over the open Web.

One of the projects and campaigns around the world is 100 quotes from Women about the Web. Behind this campaign is Renata Avila, Global Manager for the Web We Want Initiative, collected the quotes, pointing out that “one must remember that both the Web and the Internet were designed by men and that still the 50% of the global population has a lot of ideas, new structures, architectures and innovation to contribute to each layer. And women in our space are really present and active and vocal.”

You can read 100 quotes by women enagaged on the web, including yours truly. What is the web 100 women want?

 

Bridging the Digital Divide: Mobile and Social Media

In case you missed my article Going Mobile published by Index on Censorship, here is an update article published at Rising Voices.

Technology experts and activists have for years attempted to bridge the gap between those with access to technology and those without, using innovative products and initiatives, like the $100 laptop developed by the organisation One Laptop per Child.

But it takes more than a computer to bridge the gap. The mobile phone has emerged as a powerful tool for social engagement; mobile technology and social media applications are playing a vital role in giving excluded groups a voice. Around 70 per cent of mobile phone users are in developing countries, mostly in the global South, according to the UN agency the International Telecommunications Union. Mobile phones are the first telecommunications technology in history to have more users in the developing rather than developed world.

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/africa-renewal/5755511627/in/photostream/

While access to the Internet is important, it is only the starting point, which is where mobile technology comes in. Unlike the Internet, mobile is not hampered by slow broadband speeds or electricity shortages, and can be used by those who cannot read or write. As a result, mobile phones are increasingly playing a vital role in shaping activism, raising awareness, and ultimately giving citizens a voice. New mobile platforms are simple and portable which require only simple text messaging capability to be used as a tool for a host of activities, from providing logistical support in natural disasters to tracking violence.

Despite the way in which social media and mainstream news like to talk about “new digital divides,” they are not new at all. From my own research in the field, it seems that the core issues are about social power, and access to information and skills.

Ushahidi – meaning “testimony” in Swahili – is a good example of this trend. This non-profit tech company specialises in developing free and open source software to enable users to share, interact and report on what’s happening in their society, available for anyone with a mobile phone. In a past analysis, Crowdglobe, which conducts research on crowdsourcing mapping systems, documented almost 13,000 Ushahidi crowdmaps in over 100 countries. The program allows people to set up their own map without having to install it on their web servers.

NT Mojos, a project undertaken by the Australian Government in 2011, gave citizens a voice as well asthe opportunity to become the creators of content, allowing allows them to bypass the traditional gatekeepers of information such as governments, publishing houses and media organisations, which control access to services, debate and knowledge.

A similar project in India, CGNet Swara, a mobile-based news service, was launched as a portal for the Chhattisgarh tribe, which lacks access to mainstream media. The open-source software overcomes two barriers – literacy and lack of Internet access – by allowing individuals to report news in their own language to their community and beyond. With the program, “citizen reporters” call a number to record a news item, which is then verified by a trained journalist at CGNet Swara. Once a report has been approved, any listener can hear it by dialing into the same voice messaging service with their mobile phone. Continue reading “Bridging the Digital Divide: Mobile and Social Media”

Think Tanks and Social Networks: Handling Your Social Media Presence

Recently, I had a great opportunity and chance to participate in an excellent event – an interactive conference: Policy Research, Technology, and Advocacy Converge @ the HUB, November 7-8, 2013 in Prague, hosted by Think Tank Fund. The first day of the conference started with an inspiring keynote of Scott Carpenter from Google Ideas, after which the series of panels started. I was the guest on the panel where my colleagues, Marieke Van DijkMarek Tuszynski, and I discussed the strategic choices from the management perspective, that think tanks need to consider in deciding on how to integrate use of data intensive products and their communication to new audiences in their core work. The next day, I lead an interactive workshop where we discussed how think tanks can improve their use of social networks (Twitter, Google +, Facebook, Flickr, Soundcloud, YouTube, Vimeo, Slideshare, Scribd, issuu, etc.) as a communication and collaboration tool for dissemination of information/data, and interaction with their audiences and other institutions. Check out the points made from the workshop, and slides you may find useful.